What I Wish I Knew Before Going To College (Money Management Included)

Graduates’ Perspectives on Their College Experience & College Spending

I actually started this blog because of my student loan debt. Living with so much debt impacts your life—where you can live, how much you can save, whether or not your ends will get to meet one day.

If and when I generate any income from it, I’ll give all of it to Navient. Every last cent.

If I never make money from it, I’ll be content with the personal finance knowledge I’ve gained since I first started.

I’d really prefer to make money though.

Recently, I asked a few friends to share their perspectives on college. Given what they know now, would they do everything the same?

Here’s what they said.

Let’s call them Mike and Natalie.

What was your major, and did you stay in-state for school?

Mike: I double majored in History and Japanese Studies. I stayed in-state.

Natalie: I double majored in Biochemistry and Spanish. Yes, I stayed in-state, but I didn’t want to.

Why did you choose the school you did?  

Mike: I liked that they had a language program on campus since I wanted to learn Japanese and possibly study abroad for a long time.

Natalie: It was the best option for me at the time.

Given what you know now, would you approach college the same?

Mike: Yes, I would approach it the same because I had the privilege of attending a college prep school that assisted me with the process.

They made sure to motivate and encourage us to always have college as the end goal after high school. However, one thing I would change would be to apply to more scholarships. I applied to a few but felt that I could’ve had less loans if I buckled down and applied to more.

Natalie: No, I would not approach college the same. I would have done a more practical major through another university.  Continue reading “What I Wish I Knew Before Going To College (Money Management Included)”

How To Teach Preschoolers and Kindergartners About Money

Vocabulary. Reinforcing themes. Crafts. Math. Teachable moments.

Most money management experts and professionals recommend that we embed personal finance lessons into the imaginary games that children instinctively already play.

Throughout our day-to-day activities, we should provide opportunities for children to better understand exactly what money is and how it is used.

In “15 Ways To Teach Kids About Money,” Dave Ramsey organizes his philosophy into three primary categories.

First, he presents ways we can teach preschoolers and kindergartners about money.

Second, he outlines steps we can take to teach elementary and middle-schoolers about money.

Finally, he provides money management recommendations for teenagers.  Continue reading “How To Teach Preschoolers and Kindergartners About Money”